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By Mary Tan

January 25, 2021

One of the main risks associated with drug delivery via vial containment systems is particles that can result from fragmentation and coring of rubber stoppers subjected to needle or spike punctures. This risk can be mitigated by using prefilled syringe systems, whereby the drug dosage has been filled into the syringe by the drug manufacturer. The drug dosage is then administered by subcutaneous or intramuscular injection. A prefilled syringe system generates fewer particles during drug administration, as compared to a vial containment system. Furthermore, this form of drug delivery system ensures efficiency and greater convenience.

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By Nico Brandes

March 21, 2019

The global injectable drug market sees an ever-increasing adoption of high-value biologic drug products. More than half of today’s 20 top selling injectables are biologics, and many of them are delivered in a prefilled syringe. Even though glass syringes are predominantly used for primary containment of parenterals, the (bio)pharmaceutical industry continues to cope with certain limitations associated with glass prefilled systems.

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By Global Communications

October 07, 2013

Several of West’s experts will be featured speakers at The Universe of Prefilled Syringes and Injection Devices organized by 2013 PDA Europe, which will be held November 5-6, 2013, in Basel, Switzerland. West’s representatives will report on the latest trends in the world of prefilled syringes and innovations in the field of self-injection devices.

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By Graham Reynolds

September 25, 2013

Most hand-held injectors today are designed for standard drug containers, such as prefilled syringes or cartridges. The primary markets include treatments for chronic conditions such as diabetes and hormone deficiencies where repeat injections are necessary and are administered by the patient or a caregiver.

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By Global Communications

July 11, 2013

Even though glass syringes are predominantly used for primary containment of parenterals, the (bio)pharmaceutical industry continues to cope with certain limitations associated with glass containment systems. This is especially true when the drug is administered via prefilled drug-delivery systems such as auto-injectors or pens where glass cracks and breakage can be a serious risk for patients.